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TSC

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PostSubject: TOP 10 Favorites   Sun Oct 09, 2011 7:44 pm

Remember that thread in UD? That thread that had my awesome list but got deleted by a certain bitch?

Well I'm making it again so I can post my list again we can make a list again.

I'll make mine this weekend.
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Dr Frankenollie

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PostSubject: Re: TOP 10 Favorites   Wed Oct 12, 2011 4:50 pm

I'll do my "Favourite" list/s either tomorrow or at the weekend like you TSC.
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PixarFan88

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PostSubject: Re: TOP 10 Favorites   Wed Oct 12, 2011 7:16 pm

What list?
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No-Personality

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PostSubject: Re: TOP 10 Favorites   Thu Oct 13, 2011 11:38 am

I'm also a bit confused.
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Dr Frankenollie

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PostSubject: Re: TOP 10 Favorites   Sat Oct 15, 2011 10:20 am

Here's 1-5 for my list (I'll post 6-10 tomorrow). I have begun with 5 because I want my number one to be a surprise to the reader, even if the lower half of the list will be presented later (and even if some of the members here already know my number one DAC).

I hope you enjoy reading my in-depth analyses of my 5 favourite Disney Animated Classics, and hopefully you will read my analyses for the next five.

5. Aladdin-In my opinion the best of the Disney Renaissance quartet, this film topped everything that had already came out of the Disney Studio in terms of comedy, whilst having some of the most imaginative and romantic moments ever seen in not just Disney, but also cinema as a whole. The film is an utterly remarkable, groundbreaking feat, and the creativity, heart and soul that was poured so grandly into the project resulted in a wholly awe-inspiring masterwork.

Accessible to both kids and adults, the most notorious thing about this is Robin Williams' performance. I have a love-hate relationship with both Williams and his performance in this: while he did One Hour Photo, he also did Flubber. And while in Aladdin, Williams' character (Genie) is a memorable, hugely entertaining and joyfully exuberant force for comedy, he also inspired greedy movie producers to hire well-known celebrities to voice their characters, which in turn would spout as many pop culture references as the Genie...except miss out the humour. But, alas, that's another story. So I digress.

All the characters in Aladdin are sheer, utter triumphs. The film's villain, Jafar, whilst cackling psychotically like the common Disney bad guy half the time, is also unique in being a world-weary antagonist, with sunken in eyes and a droll, bored voice (provided by the great Jonathan Freeman).

The hero's sidekicks, Abu and the mute Carpet, are entrancing, colourful and hilarious. The Sultan, whilst being a minor character, is voiced jovially and exceedingly well, and the little touches, like his excitable, child-like run is a great visual gag.

Finally, the hero himself is marvellous and not only one of my favourite Disney characters, but also one of my favourite movie characters. He is the perfect Disney hero, being funny, extremely charming, appealingly designed (based on Tom Cruise, Michael J Fox and even Calvin Klein male models) and his two portrayers (Scott Weinger and Brad Kane) are charisma concentrated. He is also a little flawed, and is easy to relate to, a great advantage for the movie.

His sweet romance with the well-rounded Princess Jasmine is one of the best believable Disney romances of all time, if not the most, and 'A Whole New World' is truly heart-warming. The other songs are just as great, like the fast-paced, brightly-coloured 'Prince Ali' and the eye-popping, well-written 'Friend Like Me.'

And finally, even though the voice of Gilbert Gottfried as Iago can irk some, I love him.



4. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs -While this is not the first Disney film I watched (The Jungle Book, Pinocchio and possibly one or two others came before it), it's the first I very clearly remember watching, and ten years on, I still am scared out of my wits by the Hag.

It’s a brilliant piece of craftsmanship; Walt Disney went against all odds to get his so-called ‘folly’ to the big screen in 1937.The characters are likable, charming and funny, the animation is rich and vibrant, and every scene shows the attention to detail Walt Disney’s loyal animators slaved over. The visual concepts and daringness of the animators is very obvious in the early ‘I’m Wishing’ sequence, where Snow White appears to be ‘shot’ from the bottom of a wishing well, with believable-looking ripples and bubbles adding to the inventive effect.

Another memorable scene is the Queen’s transformation into a terrifying, gleeful old hag; the pernicious Queen is creepy and has a ghastly grace at the start, and has a presence that even today live-action actors and actresses would struggle to command, but she becomes truly terror-inducing as the Hag. The post-transformation queen would be disturbing enough in voice alone (the Queen's vocal portrayer, Lucille LaVerne, removed her false teeth to achieve the satisfyingly menacing croak and crackle in her voice suitable for the Hag), but her formidable, ghoulish appearance completes this perfect of antagonists. Little wonder Vincent Price once said that Snow White was his favourite horror movie.

Adriana Caselotti’s voice (used for Snow White) is now iconic; it may be too shrill for some, but it compliments Snow's memorable appearance and infectiously sweet personality. In fact, Walt Disney ended up ‘owning’ Caselotti’s voice, not allowing her to use it again in cinema as it had become too associated with the Snow White character (the only time she was allowed to use it outside Disney was in The Wizard of Oz, when she made a voice cameo in the Tin Man’s introductory song).

The movie isn’t really about Snow White, but actually the forever-likable Dwarfs. Each one is hilarious in his own unique way, and they carry the movie through the darker elements of the Queen and her Magic Mirror, also giving the movie a very human quality.

It’s the Seven Dwarfs (Doc, Dopey, Grumpy, Happy, Sleepy, Sneezy, and Bashful) that give the movie heart. Some may dismiss some of the Dwarfs’ scenes (like when Grumpy refuses to wash before dinner and appears to hate Snow White) as nothing but filler or cartoonish pandering to children, but if they do, they are heartless imbeciles who should burst into flames and die. The Dwarf scenes aren’t just there for the sake of it; they make the final scenes, where Grumpy finally accepts Snow White, pack a stronger emotional punch, which of course means the happy ending is even more uplifting and touching.

Admittedly, most of the Dwarfs lack depth and their personalities can be described simply by their names; but Grumpy the Dwarf, often used as mere comic relief, develops exceedingly well, and is wholly believable as a character.

The music of Snow White is nearly unbeatable, with its songs varying between sweet, romantic and wistful (like the aforementioned ‘I’m Wishing’) and catchy, bouncy and jolly (‘Heigh Ho’, ‘Just Whistle While You Work’, etc.) But not only the songs are grand; the movie uses extensive background music, probably due to the fact its makers started their careers making cartoons that focused more on music than anything else, which in my opinion was a step towards revolutionising cinema; if you look at the old movies of the early 30’s like Dracula, you’ll notice that they lack music even during intense scenes of horror and action, which is unusual in comparison to modern movies. The frequent use of background music in Snow White was a minor milestone for cinema, and its influence made subsequent movies much more ‘cinematic’.



3. Pinocchio -The thing I really love about this film is its world. Every time I watch it, I'm transported to the lands it displays, the best of which is Geppetto's utterly delightful workshop. I am always enthralled by that place.

Pinocchio, Geppetto, Figaro, Cleo and Jiminy Cricket all appear to inhabit their own little world, bursting at the seams with creatively-designed clocks and watches (which have such great images, from a woman spanking her misbehaving son to two men clinking beer mugs together merrily). They spend their time singing and dancing in this little shop of dreams, and at night they look out into the night sky, dotted with bright, shining stars.

Not a second is wasted in this animated masterpiece. Even though I oddly haven't seen it for a few months, the film is as fresh in mind as if I watched it merely a few hours ago, rather than months. As is usual for Disney, the music is of the highest quality, and such tuneful melodies as 'Hi Diddle Dee Dee' and 'I've Got No Strings' will never leave your mind. They are catchy, undeniably fun toe-tappers that are rhythmically exuberant in their musical notes and inspired when it comes to their lyrics.

But of course the best song is 'When You Wish Upon a Star', sung almost heavenly by Cliff Edwards (also the voice of the charismatic, aforementioned Jiminy Cricket). That song became, in some ways, a magnificent mantra for the Disney Studio, and words cannot describe its beauty.

I also love the brutal darkness of the movie, and it's practically jolting how the outside world goes from colourful and only mildly threatening to terrifying (when Stromboli shows his vile true colours). Pleasure Island once horrified me, and it's still unnerving, especially due to the roly-poly Coachman and his ghoulish minions. These villains don't get punished, and scarily but truthfully so.

The film doesn't try to protect children from the very real evils of the world, and in that regard (as well as in many others) it's a bold, brave slice of cinematic genius.



2. Dumbo -Dumbo is a simple, pleasant film which has a lot of charm, and which returned to the style of Disney before his features: an animated fable with anthropomorphic animals and a moral. It’s a refreshing film with the unusual but forever preferable case of substance over style, rather than vice versa.

The thing that gives Dumbo a lot of its strength is its emotion: there are a great many funny moments, like when Mrs Jumbo throws the Ringmaster into a wooden tub of water, and also a great many tear-jerking moments. In the latter camp, the song ‘Baby Mine’ springs to mind: ‘Baby Mine’ is not only one of Disney’s greatest songs (stopped from being the best only by ‘When You Wish Upon a Star’ from Pinocchio), but also a truly beautiful, tear-inducing lullaby.

Also, throughout the film, the animation is something to marvel over. Whilst not as technically groundbreaking as Fantasia or as realistic as the animation of Bambi, the smooth look and feel to the movie gives it softness without making it too cute or fluffy. The character animation is also superb; when we learn that Mrs Jumbo so desperately wants a son, it’s not through dialogue, or even music; it’s through her expression.

I adore the characters, from the silent, child-like Dumbo (his bathing scene is pure bliss in terms of both style and substance) to Timothy Q Mouse, this movie's Jiminy Cricket, who is the only person to see through Jumbo Junior's apparent deformity; heck, he hardly even notices. Also, the way the Elephants coldly shun Dumbo is so true; they're not like other Disney villains, who are flamboyant and draped in dark colours and enjoy a cackle or two, but are the true evils of the world, taking pleasure in others' misfortune. They are the bitchiest gossipers to ever parade around the silver screen, and their comueppance, although very brief, is also very satisfying.

But the best part of Dumbo is the ending; undoubtedly one of the most uplifting endings in all of cinematic history, it’s a triumphant climax and an excellent way to finish a journey. The journey I refer to is the journey of the audience, who have laughed at Sterling Holloway as the bumbling Stork and been thrilled by the Pink Elephants, and it leaves with the promise of a lovely memory for movie-goers everywhere.

Dumbo is a perfect film that can be interpreted as a buddy comedy, a coming-of-age story, a sweet, nostalgic fable or even a harrowing and thought-provoking parable on society, sporting more emotion and a stronger story than usually seen in animation due to its simplicity.



1. Fantasia -The best of the best, this is the film which I think defines Disney: it has elements of wonder, excitement, terror, humour, romance, everything. It is an amaglamation of everything great and wonderful about Disney, brought together by the happy marriage of great animation and great music.

It features remarkable scenes that you would hardly expect to be featured in a Disney movie (especially by the ignorant general public): Satan calling up demons to dance as enflamed sprites for him above a little mountain town; Mickey Mouse technically killing someone; and perhaps most extraordinarily, telling the story of the universe's creation to the day the dinosaurs died.

Furthermore, Fantasia is a rather good introduction to the world of classical music, and every brush stroke and pencil line is an achievement, with the animators' drawings - painstakingly slaved over in Burbank, California - being brought to life by bright, lush colours and marvellous music. Every single sequence tells a mesmerising story, and characters like Chernabog, Hyacinth Hippo and others are unforgettable.

Most remember this for the 'Sorcerer's Apprentice' segment, which, while triumphant, is not the best, but it's certainly one of the best; while it ruined some of Mickey's appeal indirectly, it's first rate animation and the characterisation through facial expression and the timing of the music/animation is always impressive. The shadows implying Mickey's killing of a sentient broomstick off-screen are effective and reminiscent of the brief shadow duel in The Adventures of Robin Hood, and the little bit at the end where everything turns to black-and-white is atmospheric and a good counter-balance to the frenzy of Mickey's murderous rampage.

'The Nutcracker Suite' is also fantastic, with scenes like the little fairies floating through the flowers or doing ballet on ice beautifully. It varies between slow-paced moments and fast-paced moments, and demonstrates how skilled the original Disney animators were even they just took a simple concept and idea and made it one of the greatest movie moments ever (for example, Art Babbitt’s animation of the dancing mushrooms may be considered racially insensitive towards Asians by some, but it’s nevertheless funny and charming.)

Every protagonist, object and abstract location is full of rich detail, and every single character brilliant in their own unique way: there are the bouncy, flamboyant hippos in comical tutus; the graceful and elegant Pegasus and his family; the plump, red-faced and merry Bacchus; and finally the dark and grotesque Chernabog and his demons, with their gruesomeness intensified by the dark, creepy music.

Unequivocally, this film is an artistic masterpiece, a wholly captivating experience and the Holy Grail of animation.
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Goliath

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PostSubject: Re: TOP 10 Favorites   Tue Oct 18, 2011 6:55 pm

Top 10 favorite... what? Porn stars? Brands of beer?

Or Disney Classics?

1. The Little Mermaid
2. Rapunzel
3. The Rescuers
4. Lilo & Stitch
5. The Hunchback of Notre Dame
6. Aladdin
7. Tarzan
8. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
9. 101 Dalmatians
10. The Great Mouse Detective

Something like this... I think.


Last edited by Goliath on Wed Oct 19, 2011 6:00 pm; edited 1 time in total
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TSC

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PostSubject: Re: TOP 10 Favorites   Tue Oct 18, 2011 7:05 pm

NNOOOOo I mean Top ten lists like Top ten sexy chicks, top ten pedophile characters, top ten animals that would kick your silly ass, top ten annoying ass sidekicks etc.
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